foie:

HELP I CANT BREATHE

foie:

HELP I CANT BREATHE

godotal:

I’ll be sure to keep an eye out for whatever the hell that is.

godotal:

I’ll be sure to keep an eye out for whatever the hell that is.

Anonymous said: how would you describe your aesthetic?

kosherqueer:

Anonymous said: hello again, pyrrhiccomedy, thank you so much for the book recs about poland! incidentally i actually recently read iron curtain, and it's one of my all time favorite books. i can't wait to read rising '44! you mentioned medieval poland, however, and i'm here for that-- i'm a medieval history student, and i'd love recs on that subject as well if you have any. no worries about their particular accessibility, i'm up for a challenge! thanks again!

WELL, if you can get your hands on a copy, grab the stultifyingly-titled Economy, Society, and Lordship in Medieval Poland: 1100-1250, by Piotr Gorecki. This is not a fun book, but it is an INCREDIBLY INFORMATIVE book. It is a slab of facts, hewn from the open face of the fact quarry.

East Central Europe in the Middle Ages: 1000-1500, by Jean Sedlar, is another imposing brick of scholarship worth owning. I actually did find this one pretty accessible: Sedlar’s prose style is very lucid. It is also, however, very dry. 

Grab one if you want more of an overview of the entire region: grab the other if you’re ready to zoom in on the impossible minutiae of medieval life in Poland.

hrtbps:

More than a decade after Moscow withdrew its forces from Latvia, a crumbling Soviet-era military building is slowly consumed by the Baltic sea near Liepãjasuch.

hrtbps:

More than a decade after Moscow withdrew its forces from Latvia, a crumbling Soviet-era military building is slowly consumed by the Baltic sea near Liepãjasuch.

before I got a cat I promised myself I wouldn’t turn into one of those weird people who can never shut up about their cats and basically I’ve never let myself down so bad in my life

Anonymous said: God's Playground by Norman Davies is pretty much one of the best overviews on Polish history. it starts with it's early origins and goes through their history up to the early 80's (when the book was published).

Thank you so much for the rec! Considering how much I love Rising ‘44, I’ll have to pick it up.

Anonymous said: hello pyrrhiccomedy, your comment about poland the other day really stuck with me and i was wondering if you could recommend any books about poland that you particularly thought stood out? i'm really interested in eastern europe right now but i'm at the beginning stages and i don't really know where to start, so this would be a huge help (especially bc i really trust your judgement)! actually if you are so inclined, any book recommendations about the region would be much appreciated. thanks!

SOMEBODY WANTS TO LEARN ABOUT POLAND!!image

All right, if you want one book to get you started on the region that will inspire you to learn more, I’ve got to recommend Iron Curtain, by Anne Applebaum. Applebaum is also the author of the Pulitzer prize-winning Gulag, which is about as perfect as a book can be. She is the rare historian who combines a deeply engaging writing style, impeccable scholarship, accessibility to laymen, and an infectious passion for her area of expertise. 

Iron Curtain is about Eastern Europe from 1944 to 1956, and while it follows Poland closely, you’ll also get to learn about what’s happening everywhere in the region. It’s a great place to start not just because it’s so good (IT’S SO GOOD THOUGH), but because it also doesn’t ask you to know too much going in. You know that Poland was invaded by both Germany and the Soviet Union, and then the Germans took over, and then the Soviets pushed the Germans out and took over instead (and were not really much better), and the West abandoned Poland to its fate (albeit without any realistic alternative), right? All right then, you’re good to go.

But if you want something a bit less historical overview-y and a bit more like being stabbed in the fucking heart over and over and over again for 600 pages, try Rising ‘44, by Norman Davies. 

If you’re not aware, Warsaw was razed to the ground in 1944, as one of the last acts of the Nazi occupiers. The Red Army, camped nearby, simply watched. Dead Poles, after all, would be easier to subjugate than live Poles. The Western Allies…uhh, sort of just decided that helping Poland would be too much effort, even while the Polish Resistance held out against the German war machine for sixty-three days. Sorry if this paragraph isn’t very funny, but the Warsaw Uprising was simply one of the most magnificent feats of desperate heroism in Western history: and its nearly-complete abandonment has been suppressed in Western scholarship ever since, for being what most consider to be the most shameful act perpetrated by the “good guys” during World War 2.

Please note that these are both books about Poland’s comparatively recent history, but that is not because Poland’s recent history is more interesting than its ancient history. Because medieval Poland was THE MOST INTERESTING PLACE IN EUROPE for about THREE HUNDRED YEARS. I just don’t know any particularly accessible books about that period. Actually, if anyone can recommend any, please do, because I’d love to add to my ever-more-unwieldy collection of scholarship about Poland.

invisiblestories:

"The recruits of 1914 have the look of ghosts. They are queuing up to be slaughtered: they are already dead." - Geoff Dyer, The Missing of the Somme
[Image: Austrian soldier at the wooden trenches during WWI, Eastern Europe, 1915, via deathandmysticism]

invisiblestories:

"The recruits of 1914 have the look of ghosts. They are queuing up to be slaughtered: they are already dead." - Geoff Dyer, The Missing of the Somme

[Image: Austrian soldier at the wooden trenches during WWI, Eastern Europe, 1915, via deathandmysticism]

Anonymous said: Can you link your flight rising username/lair #? Might make it easier to buy your dragons :)

pyrrhiccomedy:

I’m PyrrhicComedy! Here’s my lair, most of the for-sale dragons are on page 3.

also ugh oh my god I tried to link all of them individually in the OP but I fucked it up, it’s fixed now click here if you want to see the OP with actual links in it to the dragons

forceofconviction said: WAIT YOU HAVE AN FR OMG.

I LOVE DRAGON GAME

Anonymous said: What would happen if the human eye was removed and the muscles/optic nerve cut? Both eyes. I'm a writer; I just want to write this accurately. Would there be blood? How much blood? How much pain? How do you survive this? (I get that this blog isn't the best place to ask, just praying you'll know. It's a difficult one to find an answer for.) Please answer privately :3

Yo son I can’t answer your gross eyeball question privately if you contact me anon

but I’m pretty sure anybody who follows me knows to occasionally expect gross stuff about eyeballs, so lemme point you in the right direction.

The word you should be googling is “enucleation.” That’s the proper term for removal of the eye. Surgical enucleation is when your eye is removed by a doctor in a nice, sanitary environment, usually because of some kind of ocular tumor. “Traumatic enucleation” is when it’s done with, you know, a spoon and what might be described as an excess of zeal. This is most commonly seen in patients suffering from psychosis, as an extreme form of self-harm.

Try “medical complications of enucleation” and “self-inflicted enucleation psychosis” for some squishy, squelchy, worst-case details. You might also want to search for the testimony of soldiers who experienced the loss of an eye in battle. In about ten minutes I found some very frank descriptions on both veterans’ message boards, and in journal entries from soldiers from the Civil War, WW1, the Crimean War, etc.

It’s not as dangerous or as painful as you’re probably imagining it. Like, I’m not gonna volunteer, or anything. But in the grand scheme of things, losing an eye isn’t really that bad. I’d rather lose an eye than, like, a foot, in terms of both pain and potentially life-threatening complications.

“For a start, they analysed hurricane data from 1950, but hurricanes all had female names at first. They only started getting male names on alternate years in 1979. This matters because hurricanes have also, on average, been getting less deadly over time. “It could be that more people die in female-named hurricanes, simply because more people died in hurricanes on average before they started getting male names,” says Lazo.”

Yup, that study on hurricane names is apparently chock-full of methodological error. Analyzing the post-1979 hurricanes alone (which would give you a comparable set of male-named and female-named hurricanes) doesn’t give any kind of statistical significance. They’re also including indirect deaths that don’t have anything to do with people’s willingness to evacuate (e.g. in cleanup operations) and basing perception data on psych studies of small samples of college students.

So yeah, this study can’t actually say anything either way about our perception of male-named or female-named hurricanes. That doesn’t rule out the possibility of some effect, but this study couldn’t find one. The article links to a whole lot of other criticism, if you’re interested.

(via jakke)

Oh

(via thedykezone) arielfabulous (via wrenchesabound)

helotastic:

YOU GUYS I’VE FOUND IT. THE SINGLE GREATEST TIME-LAPSE EUROPEAN HISTORY MAP. THE ONLY ONE YOU WILL EVER NEED.

Really, watch this. It’s fantastic.

(Source: vimeo.com)