gwyndor:

gwyndor:

i could get this image printed on a dakimakura. nothing is stopping me. its the right dimensions and resolution and size and i have the money. i could literally own a fucked up anime sex pillow but with an image of French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte. what a time to be alive


never give up on your dreams

gwyndor:

gwyndor:

i could get this image printed on a dakimakura. nothing is stopping me. its the right dimensions and resolution and size and i have the money. i could literally own a fucked up anime sex pillow but with an image of French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte. what a time to be alive

image

never give up on your dreams

yeltsinwasright:

kosherqueer:

armisael:

i know its supposed to be like social list but did anyone think this through

organize the things you love, like the economy

collaborate in the workplace

yeltsinwasright:

kosherqueer:

armisael:

i know its supposed to be like social list but did anyone think this through

organize the things you love, like the economy

collaborate in the workplace

melkior:

send hELP

(Source: Washington Post)

hinoneko:

jonpertwee:

loudmusicandloudersex:

lightningstarborne:

why the fuck wouldn’t you read a book, unless you’re illiterate

This literally made me sad and I just want to go to sleep now

I think it’s because people are so stressed and working all the time. Less college grads read than high school grads — that should tell you something. Capitalism crushes the people’s souls.

Plus, think of the books you have to read for class in high school/college. Unless you really enjoy a certain type of literature (and/or have a really great teacher) a lot of it is going to feel like junk you’re forced to suffer through.
So for quite a few people, their perception of “adult” books is super-dense language and unpleasant subject matter, while the last books they really enjoyed reading on their own terms (like those 500+ installment chapter book series) might not be something they consider appropriate/appealing for people their age.

I’m calling bullshit on this whole infographic. How would they even collect this kind of information? I sure as hell don’t remember seeing any questions about my reading habits the last time I took the US Census. Who are they polling? What’s their sample size? What demographic did they poll? This stinks.
So: “RobertBrewer.org” is the personal website of a Christian pastor. On his own website, he explains that the data is has been attributed to something called ‘the Jenkins Group,’ which is a book publisher, not an independent polling agency, and certainly not an unbiased source of data when it comes to reading habits. Brewer also explains that the Jenkins Group itself distances itself from the statistics: they were informally presented by the owner of the company at a party, and were never actually published.
When I read that, I hear “the owner of a publishing company pulled these numbers out of his ass to impress his friends, but since he’s the boss we can’t just say that,” but draw your own conclusions.

hinoneko:

jonpertwee:

loudmusicandloudersex:

lightningstarborne:

why the fuck wouldn’t you read a book, unless you’re illiterate

This literally made me sad and I just want to go to sleep now

I think it’s because people are so stressed and working all the time. Less college grads read than high school grads — that should tell you something. Capitalism crushes the people’s souls.

Plus, think of the books you have to read for class in high school/college. Unless you really enjoy a certain type of literature (and/or have a really great teacher) a lot of it is going to feel like junk you’re forced to suffer through.

So for quite a few people, their perception of “adult” books is super-dense language and unpleasant subject matter, while the last books they really enjoyed reading on their own terms (like those 500+ installment chapter book series) might not be something they consider appropriate/appealing for people their age.

I’m calling bullshit on this whole infographic. How would they even collect this kind of information? I sure as hell don’t remember seeing any questions about my reading habits the last time I took the US Census. Who are they polling? What’s their sample size? What demographic did they poll? This stinks.

So: “RobertBrewer.org” is the personal website of a Christian pastor. On his own website, he explains that the data is has been attributed to something called ‘the Jenkins Group,’ which is a book publisher, not an independent polling agency, and certainly not an unbiased source of data when it comes to reading habits. Brewer also explains that the Jenkins Group itself distances itself from the statistics: they were informally presented by the owner of the company at a party, and were never actually published.

When I read that, I hear “the owner of a publishing company pulled these numbers out of his ass to impress his friends, but since he’s the boss we can’t just say that,” but draw your own conclusions.

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)

foie:

HELP I CANT BREATHE

foie:

HELP I CANT BREATHE

godotal:

I’ll be sure to keep an eye out for whatever the hell that is.

godotal:

I’ll be sure to keep an eye out for whatever the hell that is.

Anonymous said: how would you describe your aesthetic?

kosherqueer:

Anonymous said: hello again, pyrrhiccomedy, thank you so much for the book recs about poland! incidentally i actually recently read iron curtain, and it's one of my all time favorite books. i can't wait to read rising '44! you mentioned medieval poland, however, and i'm here for that-- i'm a medieval history student, and i'd love recs on that subject as well if you have any. no worries about their particular accessibility, i'm up for a challenge! thanks again!

WELL, if you can get your hands on a copy, grab the stultifyingly-titled Economy, Society, and Lordship in Medieval Poland: 1100-1250, by Piotr Gorecki. This is not a fun book, but it is an INCREDIBLY INFORMATIVE book. It is a slab of facts, hewn from the open face of the fact quarry.

East Central Europe in the Middle Ages: 1000-1500, by Jean Sedlar, is another imposing brick of scholarship worth owning. I actually did find this one pretty accessible: Sedlar’s prose style is very lucid. It is also, however, very dry. 

Grab one if you want more of an overview of the entire region: grab the other if you’re ready to zoom in on the impossible minutiae of medieval life in Poland.

hrtbps:

More than a decade after Moscow withdrew its forces from Latvia, a crumbling Soviet-era military building is slowly consumed by the Baltic sea near Liepãjasuch.

hrtbps:

More than a decade after Moscow withdrew its forces from Latvia, a crumbling Soviet-era military building is slowly consumed by the Baltic sea near Liepãjasuch.

before I got a cat I promised myself I wouldn’t turn into one of those weird people who can never shut up about their cats and basically I’ve never let myself down so bad in my life

Anonymous said: God's Playground by Norman Davies is pretty much one of the best overviews on Polish history. it starts with it's early origins and goes through their history up to the early 80's (when the book was published).

Thank you so much for the rec! Considering how much I love Rising ‘44, I’ll have to pick it up.

Anonymous said: hello pyrrhiccomedy, your comment about poland the other day really stuck with me and i was wondering if you could recommend any books about poland that you particularly thought stood out? i'm really interested in eastern europe right now but i'm at the beginning stages and i don't really know where to start, so this would be a huge help (especially bc i really trust your judgement)! actually if you are so inclined, any book recommendations about the region would be much appreciated. thanks!

SOMEBODY WANTS TO LEARN ABOUT POLAND!!image

All right, if you want one book to get you started on the region that will inspire you to learn more, I’ve got to recommend Iron Curtain, by Anne Applebaum. Applebaum is also the author of the Pulitzer prize-winning Gulag, which is about as perfect as a book can be. She is the rare historian who combines a deeply engaging writing style, impeccable scholarship, accessibility to laymen, and an infectious passion for her area of expertise. 

Iron Curtain is about Eastern Europe from 1944 to 1956, and while it follows Poland closely, you’ll also get to learn about what’s happening everywhere in the region. It’s a great place to start not just because it’s so good (IT’S SO GOOD THOUGH), but because it also doesn’t ask you to know too much going in. You know that Poland was invaded by both Germany and the Soviet Union, and then the Germans took over, and then the Soviets pushed the Germans out and took over instead (and were not really much better), and the West abandoned Poland to its fate (albeit without any realistic alternative), right? All right then, you’re good to go.

But if you want something a bit less historical overview-y and a bit more like being stabbed in the fucking heart over and over and over again for 600 pages, try Rising ‘44, by Norman Davies. 

If you’re not aware, Warsaw was razed to the ground in 1944, as one of the last acts of the Nazi occupiers. The Red Army, camped nearby, simply watched. Dead Poles, after all, would be easier to subjugate than live Poles. The Western Allies…uhh, sort of just decided that helping Poland would be too much effort, even while the Polish Resistance held out against the German war machine for sixty-three days. Sorry if this paragraph isn’t very funny, but the Warsaw Uprising was simply one of the most magnificent feats of desperate heroism in Western history: and its nearly-complete abandonment has been suppressed in Western scholarship ever since, for being what most consider to be the most shameful act perpetrated by the “good guys” during World War 2.

Please note that these are both books about Poland’s comparatively recent history, but that is not because Poland’s recent history is more interesting than its ancient history. Because medieval Poland was THE MOST INTERESTING PLACE IN EUROPE for about THREE HUNDRED YEARS. I just don’t know any particularly accessible books about that period. Actually, if anyone can recommend any, please do, because I’d love to add to my ever-more-unwieldy collection of scholarship about Poland.